Healthcare Industry News:  Parkinson's disease 

Biopharmaceuticals Neurology

 News Release - January 23, 2007

Amicus Therapeutics Receives Grant From Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research

CRANBURY, N.J., Jan. 23 (HSMN NewsFeed) -- Amicus Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company developing small-molecule, orally administered pharmacological chaperones for the treatment of human genetic diseases, announced today that it has received a grant from The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) to support research into a new treatment for Parkinson's disease using the Company's pharmacological chaperone technology.

Amicus received the funding under the Therapeutics Development Initiative, MJFF's first funding initiative open exclusively to researchers at biotech and pharmaceutical companies. The program is designed to catalyze and expand industry investment in Parkinson's drug development.

The award will further promising early research at Amicus into a new treatment for Parkinson's and will help the company rapidly advance the evaluation of its compounds in animal models of the disease. This research represents one of several initiatives at Amicus to evaluate new treatments for a broader range of diseases based on pharmacological chaperone technology.

About Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research

Founded in 2000, The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research is dedicated to ensuring the development of a cure for Parkinson's disease within this decade through an aggressively funded research agenda. The Foundation has funded more than $90 million in research to date, either directly or through partnerships.

About Amicus Therapeutics

Amicus Therapeutics is a biopharmaceutical company developing novel, oral therapeutics known as pharmacological chaperones for the treatment of a range of human genetic diseases. Pharmacological chaperone technology involves the use of small molecules to restore or improve biological activity in cells by selectively binding to misfolded proteins caused by genetic mutations. Amicus is initially targeting lysosomal storage disorders, which are severe, chronic genetic diseases with unmet medical needs. Amicus is currently conducting Phase 2 clinical trials for its lead compound, Amigal(TM), for Fabry disease, has completed Phase 1 clinical trials of AT2101 for Gaucher disease and is conducting Phase 1 clinical trials of AT2220 for Pompe disease.


Source: Amicus Therapeutics

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