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Biopharmaceuticals Oncology

 News Release - April 14, 2022

NCCN Guidelines(R) Recommend VONJO(TM) (pacritinib) for the Treatment of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

VONJO is the only approved JAK inhibitor recommended by NCCN for myelofibrosis patients regardless of platelet count

SEATTLE, April 14, 2022 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- CTI BioPharma Corp. (Nasdaq: CTIC) today announced that VONJO™ (pacritinib), its novel oral kinase inhibitor with specificity for JAK2 and IRAK1, without inhibiting JAK1, has been included as a recommended treatment in the latest National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms.

"We are grateful that NCCN acted quickly to include VONJO with a Category 2A designation in its Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology as a first line treatment for high-risk patients with myelofibrosis with platelet counts <50 x 109/L who are not candidates for transplant. This therapeutic option helps address an unmet medical need for patients who previously have no other treatment options. There is no other FDA-approved first line treatment for these patients with a 2A designation within the NCCN guidelines," said Adam R. Craig, M.D., Ph.D., President, and Chief Executive Officer of CTI BioPharma. "Additionally, VONJO was included as a Category 2A designation as second line treatment for lower-risk and higher-risk patients with myelofibrosis with platelet counts ≥50 x 109/L who are not candidates for transplant. This placement provides additional treatment options for patients with myelofibrosis."

The new NCCN Guidelines are available online at www.nccn.org.

About VONJO (pacritinib)

Pacritinib is an oral kinase inhibitor with activity against wild type Janus Associated Kinase 2 (JAK2), mutant JAK2V617F form and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3), which contribute to signaling of a number of cytokines and growth factors that are important for hematopoiesis and immune function. Myelofibrosis is often associated with dysregulated JAK2 signaling. Pacritinib has higher inhibitory activity for JAK2 over other family members, JAK3 and TYK2. At clinically relevant concentrations, pacritinib does not inhibit JAK1. Pacritinib exhibits inhibitory activity against additional cellular kinases (such as CSF1R and IRAK1), the clinical relevance of which is unknown.

VONJO is indicated for the treatment of adults with intermediate or high-risk primary or secondary (post-polycythemia vera or post-essential thrombocythemia) myelofibrosis with a platelet count below 50 × 109/L. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on spleen volume reduction. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in a confirmatory trial(s).

Important VONJO Safety Information

Hemorrhage

Serious (11%) and fatal (2%) hemorrhages have occurred in VONJO-treated patients with platelet counts <100 × 109/L. Serious (13%) and fatal (2%) hemorrhages have occurred in VONJO-treated patients with platelet counts <50 × 109/L. Grade ≥3 bleeding events (defined as requiring transfusion or invasive intervention) occurred in 15% of patients treated with VONJO compared to 7% of patients treated on the control arm. Due to hemorrhage, VONJO dose-reductions, dose interruptions, or permanent discontinuations occurred in 3%, 3%, and 5% of patients, respectively.

Avoid use of VONJO in patients with active bleeding and hold VONJO 7 days prior to any planned surgical or invasive procedures. Assess platelet counts periodically, as clinically indicated. Manage hemorrhage using treatment interruption and medical intervention.

Diarrhea

VONJO causes diarrhea in approximately 48% of patients compared to 15% of patients treated on the control arm. The median time to resolution in VONJO-treated patients was 2 weeks. The incidence of reported diarrhea decreased over time with 41% of patients reporting diarrhea in the first 8 weeks of treatment, 15% in Weeks 8 through 16, and 8% in Weeks 16 through 24. Diarrhea resulted in treatment interruption in 3% of VONJO-treated patients. None of the VONJO-treated patients reported diarrhea that resulted in treatment discontinuation. Serious diarrhea adverse reactions occurred in 2% of patients treated with VONJO compared to no such adverse reactions in patients in the control arm.

Control pre-existing diarrhea before starting VONJO treatment. Manage diarrhea with antidiarrheal medications, fluid replacement, and dose-modification. Treat diarrhea with anti–diarrheal medications promptly at the first onset of symptoms. Interrupt or reduce VONJO dose in patients with significant diarrhea despite optimal supportive care.

Thrombocytopenia

VONJO can cause worsening thrombocytopenia. VONJO dosing was reduced due to worsening thrombocytopenia in 2% of patients with pre–existing moderate to severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count <100 × 109/L). VONJO dosing was reduced due to worsening thrombocytopenia in 2% of patients with pre–existing severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count <50 × 109/L).

Monitor platelet count prior to VONJO treatment and as clinically indicated during treatment. Interrupt VONJO in patients with clinically significant worsening of thrombocytopenia that lasts for more than 7 days. Restart VONJO at 50% of the last given dose once the toxicity has resolved. If toxicity recurs hold VONJO. Restart VONJO at 50% of the last given dose once the toxicity has resolved.

Prolonged QT interval

VONJO can cause prolongation of the QTc interval. QTc prolongation of >500 msec was higher in VONJO-treated patients than in patients in the control arm (1.4% vs 1%). QTc increase from baseline by 60 msec or higher was greater in VONJO-treated patients than in control arm patients (1.9% vs 1%). Adverse reactions of QTc prolongation were reported for 3.8% of VONJO-treated patients and 2% of control arm patients. No cases of torsades de pointes were reported.

Avoid use of VONJO in patients with a baseline QTc of >480 msec. Avoid use of drugs with significant potential for QTc prolongation in combination with VONJO. Correct hypokalemia prior to and during VONJO treatment. Manage QTc prolongation using VONJO interruption and electrolyte management.

Major Adverse Cardiac Events (MACE)

Another Janus associated kinase (JAK)-inhibitor has increased the risk of MACE, including cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stroke (compared to those treated with TNF blockers) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a condition for which VONJO is not indicated.

Consider the benefits and risks for the individual patient prior to initiating or continuing therapy with VONJO particularly in patients who are current or past smokers and patients with other cardiovascular risk factors. Patients should be informed about the symptoms of serious cardiovascular events and the steps to take if they occur.

Thrombosis

Another JAK-inhibitor has increased the risk of thrombosis, including deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and arterial thrombosis (compared to those treated with TNF blockers) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a condition for which VONJO is not indicated.

Patients with symptoms of thrombosis should be promptly evaluated and treated appropriately.

Secondary Malignancies

Another JAK-inhibitor has increased the risk of lymphoma and other malignancies excluding non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) (compared to those treated with TNF blockers) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a condition for which VONJO is not indicated. Patients who are current or past smokers are at additional increased risk.

Consider the benefits and risks for the individual patient prior to initiating or continuing therapy with VONJO, particularly in patients with a known malignancy (other than a successfully treated NMSC), patients who develop a malignancy, and patients who are current or past smokers.

Risk of Infection

Another JAK-inhibitor has increased the risk of serious infections (compared to best available therapy) in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. Serious bacterial, mycobacterial, fungal and viral infections may occur in patients treated with VONJO. Delay starting therapy with VONJO until active serious infections have resolved. Observe patients receiving VONJO for signs and symptoms of infection and manage promptly. Use active surveillance and prophylactic antibiotics according to clinical guidelines.

Interactions with CYP3A4 Inhibitors or Inducers

Co-administration of VONJO with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors or inducers is contraindicated. Avoid concomitant use of VONJO with moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors or inducers.

Drug interruptions due to an adverse reaction occurred in 27% patients who received VONJO 200 mg twice daily compared to 10% of patients treated with BAT. Dosage reductions due to an adverse reaction occurred in 12% of patients who received VONJO 200 mg twice daily compared to 7% of patients treated with BAT. Permanent discontinuation due to an adverse reaction occurred in 15% of patients receiving VONJO 200 mg twice daily compared to 12% of patients treated with BAT.

Please visit http://www.ctibiopharma.com/vonjo_prescribing_information for full Prescribing Information and the Medication Guide.

About National Comprehensive Cancer Network

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) is a not-for-profit alliance of leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education. NCCN is dedicated to improving and facilitating quality, effective, equitable, and accessible cancer care so all patients can live better lives. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) provide transparent, evidence-based, expert consensus recommendations for cancer treatment, prevention, and supportive services; they are the recognized standard for clinical direction and policy in cancer management and the most thorough and frequently-updated clinical practice guidelines available in any area of medicine. The NCCN Guidelines for Patients® provide expert cancer treatment information to inform and empower patients and caregivers, through support from the NCCN Foundation®. NCCN also advances continuing education, global initiatives, policy, and research collaboration and publication in oncology. Visit NCCN.org for more information and follow NCCN on Facebook @NCCNorg, Instagram @NCCNorg, and Twitter @NCCN.

About CTI BioPharma Corp.

We are a commercial biopharmaceutical company focused on the acquisition, development and commercialization of novel targeted therapies for blood-related cancers that offer a unique benefit to patients and their healthcare providers. CTI has one FDA-approved product VONJOTM (pacritinib), a JAK2 and IRAK1, that spares JAK1. VONJO is approved for the treatment of adults with intermediate or high-risk primary or secondary (post-polycythemia vera or post-essential thrombocythemia) myelofibrosis with a platelet count below 50 × 109/L. CTI is conducting the Phase 3 PACIFICA study of VONJO in patients with myelofibrosis and severe thrombocytopenia as a post-marketing requirement.


Source: CTI BioPharma

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